The Lifestyle

This blog is for those passionate about exercise and eating healthy as well as those who want and need motivation to work towards reaching their fitness and health goals by ditching the temporary diet and adopting a lifestyle that is both healthy and enjoyable.
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Posts tagged "work out"

no….

…fine.

(an example of what goes through my mind…you’re welcome.)

That awkward moment when you have to dress like a semi decent person and you realize you’ve spent all you money on workout clothes….

Get paid to go to the gym..such a fabulous idea.

Mike Stack—Applied Fitness Solutions

by Jason Fitzgerald · about a month ago · Fitness

This piece was written by guest contributor Jason Fitzgerald, a running coach at StrengthRunning.com and 2:39 marathoner. He is also co-founder of Run Your BQ, a program dedicated to helping marathoners qualify for the Boston Marathon. The view expressed herein are his.

In the old days, runners ran. Ask runners a few generations older than you what they did for their daily workout, and they’ll likely answer, “I ran.” But no matter what race you’re preparing for, you might not want to stick to mom’s old training routine. We’ve learned a lot over the last 30 to 40 years, and running has evolved.

Today, runners need to do more than just run. Runners need to be strong and athletic. If they’re not, they can get hurt even if they practice good running form. In fact, some injury statistics put the annual injury rate for runners at a staggering 66 percent. That’s higher than professional football!

Reducing the injury rate isn’t actually that difficult, though. In fact, we can do so effectively with just 10 to 20 minutes a day of strength training.

Going Strong — The Basics

The benefits of strength training for runners are real — for both injury prevention and performance. So if the goal is to simply run easier with less pain or get faster in your next race, try adding a few strength sessions every week. Using runner-specific strength exercises will increase structural fitness — the ability of your bones, ligaments, tendons, and muscles to withstand the impact of running. Several studies have shown that while most forms of strength training can help improve overall performance, adding heavy resistance exercises can make you faster during the final sprint of a race [1] [2].

Strength work is especially important for injury-prone runners and those who are putting in a lot of miles. So for marathoners, that means at least three strength workouts every week! While building your aerobic engine (read: endurance) through running, it’s key to counteract all that wear and tear with the right exercises.

Making Moves — Strength Work for Runners

Since many of us live fairly sedentary lives in front of a computer all day, it’s no wonder running injuries are so common — we’ve lost all our strength! But which exercises are most effective for runners?

The best exercises for runners train movements, not muscles. So stick to compound, multi-joint exercises in the gym. Some of the classics include deadlifts, squats, pull-ups, chin-ups, bench press, and step-ups onto an elevated platform. These exercises target functional movements you do in real life, like bending down, pushing and pulling things, and picking things up. (Above all else, make sure your form is correct!) Complement these with a good dose of bodyweight exercises you can do in your living room after an easy run (here’s an eight week progression you can follow).

Bodyweight routines are more restorative and help you recover from running while still building the strength needed to help prevent future overuse injuries. A majority of running injuries are caused by weak hips — a major problem area for runners who sit for most of the day. One solution is the ITB Rehab Routine, a series of exercises that treats and prevents IT band injuries but also works well for general injury prevention. It focuses on hip and glute strength — two of the most important stabilizing muscles that are used while running.

Other effective exercises you can do almost anywhere include lunges, planks, pistol squats, push-ups, side planks, bird-dogs, and side leg lifts. All of these build the core strength you need to prevent injuries and get stronger.

Strength session can be quick, too: Simply pick 3-5 exercises and do 2-3 sets each, aiming for 4-8 repetitions. And don’t be afraid to lift heavy: Remember, heavy weight helps runners! Just keep in mind these are more intense and should be done just 1-2 times every week.

In Good Time — Strength Work Scheduling Tips

Scheduling these exercises isn’t difficult — simplicity is the best policy here! Follow these three easy principles to make sure your strength sessions fit well with your running schedule.

1. Save the weights for post-run. Since gym workouts are higher intensity, do these after you run (immediately or later in the day) on moderate effort days. Avoid doing them on your long run or workout days since you’re already fatigued from your running. Your form may suffer so we don’t want to increase your injury risk. And keep your easy days easy — no hard lifting when you should be prioritizing recovery!

2. Bodyweight? Piece of cake. Bodyweight sessions are usually a low to moderate effort and can be done on any day of the week. Do them right after you finish your run and they’ll help you warm-down properly by increasing your range of motion and preventing muscle adhesions (when muscles get knotty from scar tissue). By doing this you’ll avoid a lot of the aches and pains that are too common with most runners.

Start with just five minutes of strength exercises (or 4-6 exercises) after your run and build from there. It’s more important to do something than nothing at all, so just get started. Don’t worry if it’s the perfect exercise or routine — you’ll notice yourself feeling better in no time.

3. Ready for more? Once you’re comfortable with the basic exercises, start increasing your reps or the time that you’re doing them. Just make sure you’re adding several types of exercises (mentioned earlier) so you’re keeping the variety up — your body will benefit most when it’s working multiple muscle groups.

When you’re doing 15 to 20 minutes of strength work a day your injury risk will decrease dramatically, allowing you to run more, train faster, and ultimately race faster. You’ll never be sidelined again.

Works Cited

  1. Cyclists Improve Pedalling Efficacy and Performance After Heavy Strength Training. Hansen, E.A., Rønnestad, B.R., Vegge, G., et al. Center for Sensory-Motor Interaction (SMI), Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Denmark. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 2011 Dec 2. [Epub ahead of print]. []
  2. Effect of resistance training regimens on treadmill running and neuromuscular performance in recreational endurance runners. Mikkola, J., Vesterinen, V., Taipale, R., et al. KIHU-Research Institute for Olympic Sports, Jyväskylä, Finland. Journal of Sports Sciences, 2011 Oct;29(13):1359-71. Epub 2011 Aug 22. []

Unstable Surface Training: Fact vs Fallacy

A growing trend in the fitness industry is the use of unstable surfaces during resistance training. Walk through any local gym or personal training studio and you will see BOSU domes (both sides up), air disks, and balance boards. Some fitness professionals claim that unstable surface training increases balance, proprioception (ability for the body to know where it is and how it is moving), and core stability.

At first glance, it is easy to see why the majority of the population would believe such claims. If you can balance on an unstable surface, why wouldn’t you be able to balance better on a stable surface? If your core is constantly contracting to maintain your center of mass, why wouldn’t your core stability improve? While these claims seem valid, current research does not support these conclusions.

Let’s start by exploring the claim of increased balance. There are few, if any, studies to date that show that the type of increased balance and core stability developed through exercises performed on unstable surfaces transfers to stable surfaces. Therefore, while performing exercises on unstable surfaces may increase an individual’s ability to perform the exercises on that specific surface, it does not necessarily transfer to stable surfaces (ground, grass, court, and even ice). Optimal balance is gained by performing a given task on the surface on which it will be performed in everyday life. Many researchers also believe that performing exercises or sport skills on unstable surfaces could DECREASE the ability to perform the same tasks on a stable surface. As individuals begin to master movement patterns (swinging a bat, bench pressing, squatting, etc.), specific communication pathways between the brain and muscle are created for each movement pattern. When performing the same movement pattern on an unstable surface, it is possible that the individual could interfere with the original pattern created in a stable environment. In addition, since the unstable surface is not specific to the movement being practiced (different surface), the time spent in an unstable environment could have been better spent mastering the movement pattern in a stable environment.

Another popular claim made by proponents of unstable surface training is an increase in core stabilization. As with balance, any core stabilization that is possibly enhanced by activity on an unstable surface has NOT been shown to transfer to stable surfaces. In addition, the ability to provide progressive overload (gradual increases in stress that force adaptation to deal with the stress) is hindered. As an individual increases strength levels, the only way progressive overload can be achieved is either by a further decrease in the surface stability or an increase in resistance. Could you imagine doing a 95 lb. overhead press in Fitness Solutions on a half ball? Most research even shows that performing resistance training exercises on stable surfaces requires MORE core activation and stabilization than performing the SAME exercise on an unstable surface. When performing an exercise on an unstable surface, the weight has to be reduced to such an extent that less overall activation of core musculature occurs. Instead of doing your squat and press with 95 pounds, you would have to do it with 50 pounds while standing on a BOSU ball.

One population that unstable surface training is extremely popular with is athletes. The same issues discussed earlier arise when training athletes on an unstable surface. There is not a significant transfer of skill when you move from performing sport skills (swinging a bat) on unstable surfaces to solid ground. In addition, the time spent performing sport skills on unstable surfaces could be better spent enhancing the same skill on solid ground. Another disadvantage of performing athletic skills on unstable surfaces is the resulting reduction in strength. This reduction in strength is caused by co-contraction of opposing muscles on either side of a joint. For example, when performing a calf raise, the calf muscle is doing the work, while the muscle on your shin is opposing it. When performing a calf raise, you want maximal activation of your calf and minimal activation of your shin muscle. If your shin muscle is significantly active it will reduce the strength you are able to produce with your calf muscle. Simply put, when you perform a calf raise on an unstable surface, you basically confuse the muscles, resulting in less strength (less strength = less speed, less jump height, etc.). This reduction in strength is extremely detrimental to athletic performance.

Based on current research, the use of unstable surfaces outside of a rehabilitative setting (physical therapy) is not recommended. Exercise performed on unstable surfaces does not transfer well to stable surfaces (our everyday life) nor do the risks outweigh any beneficial adaptation. In addition, some experts believe there may be a reduction in stable surface performance for the same exercise. When developing training programs for clients, fitness practitioners must incorporate the principles of exercise science into a program that will allow their clients to reach their goals. Unless your goal is performing in the circus, or doing a great job balancing on top of a ball, don’t waste your time training on unstable surfaces!

I’m going to do this work out today with my heart rate monitor on because I’m really curious how many calories it burns..It’s 12 minutes..or however long it takes you to go through the circuit 6 times

Circuit (Repeat 6 times)
50 High Knees
10 Burpees
10 squats w/ weight (She has a sandbag I’m just going to use a barbell)
10 full sit ups

That’s what’s up!!!

…It was a long one. I worked out for an hour and 30 minutes. It’s too long to write out so Ill just say..I warmed up on the speed bike..I did all upper body weights. I did supersets and timed my rest intervals and then I ended with 30 minutes of jump roping. I burned 673 calories.

If you really want the work out, just message me and of course I’ll send it to you. :)


Rowing—the Cardio Workout You Should Be Doing
Why Rowing?
Rowing is a full-body work out. It utilizes all your major muscle groups.
It is a low impact exercise and thus can be used by people of all fitness levels.
Rowing is used by many athletes in hopes to increase athletic performance because it improves aerobic fitness, increases strength, enhances coordination, and improves mobility.
Rowing scorches calories and is great for weight management. A rowing machine, when used vigorously, can burn up to 125 calories in just 15 minutes.
How do I row?
1. Grab the handle while sitting in an upright position, slightly leaning back with your legs straight. The handle should be pulled back so that it’s just above your belly button. This is the “finish” position of a stroke.2. To start the next stroke, extend your arms, pivot forward slightly from the hips, and then bring your butt forward by bending your knees. This will move you towards the machine.3. With your arms still extended, you will reach the “start” position when your chest is a couple of inches from your knees.4. Start the next stroke by pushing back through your heels as hard as you can.5. Just before your legs are fully extended, pivot from your your hips to a slight lean and then pull your arms back so that the handle is just about your belly button.6. Transition as quickly as possible to your next stroke. Remember, each stroke starts with the legs, the back follows, then the arms. Legs, back, arms(Source: FitnessRX Mag, April 2012)Beginner Work Outs
Row vigorously for 3-5 minutes, rest for 3 minutes by walking or stretching. Repeat four times.
Row in 3 minute intervals with 1 minute rests. Try to increase your pace per interval.
A More Challenging Work Out
Row in 10-minute increments for a total for 4 times. Rest 3-5 minutes in between.
Row for 20-minutes. Row 2 minutes high intensity and 1 minute recovery. Repeat throughout the 20 minutes.
Remember: 18-22 strokes per minute is lower intensity, 30-34 strokes per minute is vigorous.

Sources:www.livestrong.comFitnessRX MagazinePhoto from: Fitnessmagazine.com


Rowing—the Cardio Workout You Should Be Doing

Why Rowing?

  • Rowing is a full-body work out. It utilizes all your major muscle groups.
  • It is a low impact exercise and thus can be used by people of all fitness levels.
  • Rowing is used by many athletes in hopes to increase athletic performance because it improves aerobic fitness, increases strength, enhances coordination, and improves mobility.
  • Rowing scorches calories and is great for weight management. A rowing machine, when used vigorously, can burn up to 125 calories in just 15 minutes.

How do I row?


1. Grab the handle while sitting in an upright position, slightly leaning back with your legs straight. The handle should be pulled back so that it’s just above your belly button. This is the “finish” position of a stroke.
2. To start the next stroke, extend your arms, pivot forward slightly from the hips, and then bring your butt forward by bending your knees. This will move you towards the machine.
3. With your arms still extended, you will reach the “start” position when your chest is a couple of inches from your knees.
4. Start the next stroke by pushing back through your heels as hard as you can.
5. Just before your legs are fully extended, pivot from your your hips to a slight lean and then pull your arms back so that the handle is just about your belly button.
6. Transition as quickly as possible to your next stroke.
Remember, each stroke starts with the legs, the back follows, then the arms. Legs, back, arms
(Source: FitnessRX Mag, April 2012)

Beginner Work Outs

  • Row vigorously for 3-5 minutes, rest for 3 minutes by walking or stretching. Repeat four times.
  • Row in 3 minute intervals with 1 minute rests. Try to increase your pace per interval.

A More Challenging Work Out

  • Row in 10-minute increments for a total for 4 times. Rest 3-5 minutes in between.
  • Row for 20-minutes. Row 2 minutes high intensity and 1 minute recovery. Repeat throughout the 20 minutes.

Remember: 18-22 strokes per minute is lower intensity, 30-34 strokes per minute is vigorous.

Sources:
www.livestrong.com
FitnessRX Magazine

Photo from: Fitnessmagazine.com

by Laura Schwecherl · 3 days ago · Fitness

Illustrations by Shannon Orcutt

Who needs a gym when there’s the living room floor? Bodyweight exercises are a simple, effective way to improve balance, flexibility, and strength without machinery or extra equipment. From legs and shoulders to chest and abs, we’ve covered every part of the body that can get stronger with body resistance alone.

Full Body

1. Inchworm: Stand up tall with the legs straight, and do like Lil’ Jon and let those fingertips hit the floor. Keeping the legs straight (but not locked!), slowly lower the torso toward the floor, and then walk the hands forward. Once in a push-up position, start taking tiny steps so the feet meet the hands. Continue bugging out for 4-6 reps.

2. Tuck Jump: Standing with the knees slightly bent, jump up as high as possible (pretend Jeremy Lin is watching!) and bring the knees in toward the chest while extending the arms straight out. Land with the knees slightly bent and quickly jump (on it) again!

3. Bear Crawl: Embrace that inner grizzly. Starting on the hands and knees, rise up onto the toes, tighten the core, and slowly reach forward with the right arm and right knee, followed by the left side. Continue the crawl for 8-10 reps (or until you scare your roommates off).

4. Plyometric Push-Up: Ready to catch some air? Start on a well-padded surface and complete a traditional push-up. Then, in an explosive motion, push up hard enough to come off the floor (and hang ten for a second!). Once back on solid ground, immediately head into the next repetition.

5. Stair Climb with Bicep Curl: Turn those stairs into a cardio machine — no magic wand necessary. Grab some dumbbells (or household objects!) and briskly walk up and down the stairway while simultaneously doing bicep curls to work the whole body.

6. Mountain Climber: Starting on your hands and knees, bring the left foot forward directly under the chest while straightening the right leg. Keeping the hands on the ground and core tight, jump and switch legs. The left leg should now be extended behind the body with the right knee forward. Next up? Everest.

7. Prone Walkout: Beginning on all fours with the core engaged, slowly walk the hands forward, staying on the toes but not moving them forward. Next, gradually walk the hands backwards to the starting position, maintain stability and balance. (This dance comes next.)

8. Burpees: One of the most effective full-body exercises around, this one starts out in a low squat position with hands on the floor. Next, kick the feet back to a push-up position, complete one push-up, then immediately return the feet to the squat position. Leap up as high as possible before squatting and moving back into the push-up portion of the show.

9. Plank: Nope, we’re (thankfully) not walking the plank. Lie face down with forearms on the floor and hands clasped. Extend the legs behind the body and rise up on the toes. Keeping the back straight, tighten the core and hold the position for 30-60 seconds (or as long as you can hang).

10. Plank-to-Push-Up: Starting in a plank position, place down one hand at a time to lift up into a push-up position, with the back straight and the core engaged. Then move one arm at a time back into the plank position (forearms on the ground). Repeat, alternating the arm that makes the first move.

Legs

11. Wall Sit: Who needs a chair when there’s a wall? Slowly slide your back down a wall until the thighs are parallel to the ground. Make sure the knees are directly above the ankles and keep the back straight. Go for 60 seconds per set (or however long it takes to turn those legs to jelly). Need more fire? Add some bicep curls.

12. Lunge: Stand with the hands on the hips and feet hip-width apart. Step the right leg forward and slowly lower your body until the right knee is close to or touching the floor and bent at least 90 degrees. Return to the starting position and repeat with the left leg. Try stepping back into the lunge for a different variation.

13. Clock Lunge: Time for a challenge.Complete a traditional forward lunge, then take a big step to the right and lunge again. Finish off the semicircle with a backwards lunge, then return to standing. And all that’s one rep! Aim for 10 reps and then switch legs.

14. Lunge-to-Row: Start by doing a normal lunge. Instead of bringing that forward leg back to the starting position, raise it up off the floor while lifting the arms overhead. The leg should remain bent at about 90 degrees. Add weights to really bring the heat.

15. Lunge Jump: Ready to impress some friends? Stand with the feet together and lunge forward with the right foot. Jump straight up, propelling the arms forward while keeping the elbows bent. While in the air, switch legs and land in a lunge with the opposite leg forward. Repeat and continue switching legs. Try to do 10!

16. Curtsy Lunge: Let’s show a little respect. When lunging, step the left leg back behindthe right, bending the knees and lowering the hips until the right thigh is almost parallel to the floor. Remember to keep the torso upright and the hips square.

17. Squat: Stand with the feet parallel or turned out 15 degrees — whatever is most comfortable. Slowly start to crouch by bending the hips and knees until the thighs are at least parallel to the floor. Make sure the heels do not rise off the floor. Press through the heels to return to a standing position.

18. Pistol Squat: There may be no gun permit necessary for this one, but it’s still no joke. Stand holding the arms straight out in front of the body, and raise the right leg, flexing the right ankle and pushing the hips back. Then lower the body while keeping the right leg raised. Hold (have fun with that), then return to standing.

19. Squat Reach and Jump: Ready to add some pizzazz (and cardio!) to that squat? Perform a normal squat, but immediately jump up, reaching the arms straight overhead. Aim for 15 reps, taking a quick breather before the next set.

20. Chair Squat Pose: Stand with the feet hip-distance apart and squat until the thighs are parallel to the floor while swinging the arms up. Straighten the legs, then lift up the right knee while swinging the left arm outside the right knee. Return to standing and repeat on the other side.

21. Step-Up: This may be self-explanatory, but just in case — find a step or bench, and place the right foot on the elevated surface. Step up until the right leg is straight (do it for Channing!), then return to start. Repeat, aiming for 10-12 reps on each side.

22. Single Leg Deadlift: Start in a standing position with the feet together. Lift the right leg slightly, and lower the arms and torso while raising the right leg behind the body. Keep the left knee slightly bent and reach the arms as close to the floor as possible. Raise the torso while lowering the right leg. Switch legs.

23. Quadruped Leg Lift: Starting on the hands and knees, keep a flat back and engage the core. Raise the left leg straight back, stopping when the foot is hip-level and the thigh parallel to the floor. Balance for as long as possible, then raise the bottom right toe off the floor, tightening the butt, back, and abs (try to be graceful here!). Hold for up to 10 seconds, then switch legs.

24. Calf Raise: From a standing position, slowly rise up on the toes, keeping the knees straight and heels off the floor. Hold briefly, then come back down. Aaaand repeat. Try standing on something elevated (like a step) to achieve a wider range of motion.

Chest & Back

25. Standard Push-Up: There’s a reason this one’s a classic. With hands shoulder-width apart, keep the feet flexed at hip distance, and tighten the core. Bend the elbows until the chest reaches the ground, and then push back up (make sure to keep the elbows tucked close to the body). That’s one!

26. Dolphin Push-Up: Start out in dolphin pose (think: down-dog with elbows on the floor). Lean forward, lowering the shoulders until the head is over the hands. Pull up the arms and return to the starting position. (No ocean necessary.)

27. Donkey Kick: It’s time to embrace that wild side. Start in a push-up position, with the legs together. Tighten the core and kick both legs into the air with knees bent, reaching the feet back toward the glutes. Just try to land gently when reversing back to the starting position.

28. Handstand Push-Up: Fair warning: This move is for the pros. Get set in a headstand position against a wall and bend the elbows at a 90-degree angle, doing an upside down push-up (so the head moves toward the floor and the legs remain against the wall). First timer? Grab a friend to spot you — safety first!

29. Judo Push-up: From a push-up position, raise up those hips and in one swift movement (Hai-yah!) use the arms to lower the front of the body until the chin comes close to the floor. Swoop the head and shoulders upward and lower the hips, keeping the knees off the ground. Reverse the move to come back to the raised-hip position. Try to repeat for 30-60 seconds.

30. Reverse Fly: For DIY dumbbells, grab two cans or bottles of water. Stand up straight, with one foot in front of the other and the front knee slightly bent. With palms facing each other and the abs engaged, bend forward slightly from the waist and extend arms out to the side, squeezing the shoulder blades. Repeat. 

31. Superman: Want some superpowers?Lie face down with arms and legs extended. Keeping the torso as still as possible, simultaneously raise the arms and legs to form a small curve in the body. Cape optional.

32. Contralateral Limb Raises: Sounds fancy, huh? Here’s the breakdown: Lie on your stomach with the arms outstretched and palms facing one another. Slowly lift one arm a few inches off the floor, keeping it straight without rotating the shoulders and keeping the head and torso still. Hold the position, then lower the arm back down, moving to the other arm.

Shoulders & Arms

33. Triceps Dip: Get seated near a step or bench. Sit on the floor with knees slightly bent, and grab the edge of the elevated surface and straighten the arms. Bend them to a 90-degree angle, and straighten again while the heels push towards the floor. For some extra fire, reach the right arm out while lifting the left leg.

34. Diamond Push-UpJay-Z would approve.These push-ups get pimped out with a diamond-shaped hand position (situate them so that the thumbs and index fingers touch). This hand readjustment will give those triceps some extra (burning) love.

35. Boxer: Time to make Muhammad Ali proud. Starting with feet hip-width apart and knees bent, keep the elbows in and extend one arm forward and the other arm back. Hug the arms back in and switch arms — like you’re in the ring!

36. Shoulder Stabilization Series (I, Y, T, W O): OK, it may look crazy, but stay with us. Lie down on your stomach with arms extended overhead and palms facing each other. Move the arms into each letter formation. (Gimme a Y, you know you want to!).

37. Arm Circles: Remember P.E. class? Stand with arms extended by the sides, perpendicular to the torso. Slowly make clockwise circles for about twenty to thirty seconds (about one foot in diameter). Then reverse the movement, going counter-clockwise.

Core

38. L Seat: Take a load off (well not exactly). Seated with the legs extended and feet flexed, place the hands on the floor and slightly round the torso. Then, lift the hips off the ground, hold for five seconds and release. Repeat!

39. Rotational Push-Up: Standard push-ups not cutting it? For a variation, after coming back up into a starting push-up position, rotate the body to the right and extend the right hand overhead, forming a T with the arms and torso. Return to the starting position, do a normal push-up, then rotate to the left.

40. Dynamic Prone Plank: Starting in a standard plank position, raise the hips as high as they can go, then lower them back down. Continue this movement for as long as possible. Make sure the back stays straight and the hips don’t droop.

41. Flutter Kick: Start lying on your back with arms at your sides and palms facing down. With legs extended, lift the heels off the floor (about six inches). Make quick, small up-and-down pulses with the legs, while keeping the core engaged. Try to keep kickin’ it for a minute straight!

42. Bicycle: Lie down with knees bent and hands behind the head. With the knees in toward the chest, bring the right elbow towards the left knee as the right leg straightens. Continue alternating sides (like you’re pedaling!). Just keep the helmet in the closet.

43. Crunch: Before anyone’s crowned Cap’n Crunch, remember form is key. Lie on your back with the knees bent and feet flat on the floor. With hands behind the head,place the chin down slightly and peel the head and shoulders off the mat while engaging the core. Continue curling up until the upper back is off the mat. Hold briefly, thenlower the torso back toward the mat slowly.

44. Segmental Rotation: Target those obliques. Lying on your back with your knees bent and core tight, let the knees fall gradually to the left (feeling a good stretch). Hold for five seconds, return to center, and repeat on the right side.

45. Shoulder Bridge: Lie on your back with the knees bent and feet hip-width apart. Place arms at your side and lift up the spine and hips. Only the head, feet, arms, and shoulders should be on the ground. Then lift one leg upwards, keeping the core tight. Slowly bring the leg back down, then lift back up. Try to do 10 reps per leg, then bring the knee in place and spine back on the floor.

46. Single Leg Abdominal Press: Lie on your back with the knees bent and feet on the floor. Tighten the abs and raise the right leg, with the knee and hip bent at a 90-degree angle.Push the right hand on top of the lifted knee, using the core to create pressure between the hand and knee. Hold for five counts, and then lower back down torepeat with the left hand and knee. 

47. Double Leg Abdominal Press: Two legs is twice the fun. Follow the same run-down for  the single leg press (above), but bring up both legs at the same time, pushing the hands against the knees.

48. Side Plank: Roll to the side and come up on one foot and elbow. Make sure the hips are lifted and the core is engaged, and hang tight for 30-60 seconds (or as long as you can stomach!).

49. Sprinter Sit-Up: Want to be a speed demon without getting off the floor? Lie on your back with the legs straight and arms by your side — elbows bent at a 90-degree angle. Now sit up, bringing the left knee toward the right elbow. Lower the body and repeat on the other side.

50. Russian Twist: Sit on the floor with knees bent and feet together, lifted a few inches off the floor. With the back at a 45-degree angle from the ground, move the arms from one side to another in a twisting motion. Here, slow and steady wins the race: The slower the twist, the deeper the burn. Feel like a fitness czar yet?

I did mainly cardio today because I was feeling bloated lol

5 minutes: boxing and then alternating to high knees
2 minute break
5 minutes: speed bike resistance 20 as fast as I could
2 minute break
5 minutes: press up to crunch with 25 lb weight plate to standing row
2 minute break
5 minutes: mountain climbers to walking lunges with press up using 16 lb med ball
2 minute break
5 minutes: power rowing as fast as I could
2 minute break
5 minutes: leg lifts with crunch, bicycles, and shifting plank

Work out time: 40-45ish minutes
Calories Burned: 428

I’m liking this work out!

And on a side note, completely unrelated to the work out..this girl, Lisa, is going to get her breast implants. I think she’s crazy. She looks fine/proportional the way she is! Kinda bums me out..

Bored of just running on a treadmill??

Some of these work outs he is doing..I think are genius…others, questionable. Either way, I’m glad I belong to a 24 hour gym so I can go during slow hours to try some of these!